Tag Archives: Poetry

Domino.

Your haughty arrogance, and your sharp demeanor would render everyone insipid. Your sharp edges, and your pointed looks, your unshaken spirit, and your straight, unsmiling lips are masks they wish to bare open. They look at your dark patches and wish to scribble colour into them.

Unbeknownst to you, they try to scratch your surface and tear open barely healed wounds. They scar you and scare you. They make a spectacle out of your polished quite, and push you believing it a grand joke you’ve orchestrated. Seemingly unhurt, you try to retreat, but they have chained you with expectations you’re now honourbound to fulfill.

They don’t know you, darling. The struggle to open your eyes in the morning, and brace yourself. They don’t know you’re hardened against the tide of uncertainty, and hopelessness. They don’t know the scars you hide underneath your fancy suits, or the crescent moon on both your beautiful wrists. They don’t know that your laughter once meant joy and life, not just obligations, and pretence. They don’t know that you’re drowning and you’re shattering, and your greatest struggle is to load the dishwasher, and doing your laundry, and driving to work, and not deciphering stock values, or doing that extra credit assignment, or writing codes for the most complex programs.

Because to them you’re playing the hard-to-get game till they have drawn you out. But, they don’t know that your dark patches came from an amalgamation of different hues, drawn over and over and over.

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Falling in love with a poet

There is something about falling in love with writers and poets. They always paint pictures of you in flattering ways. Your body, your mind, your soul is a muse to them, and they add details to it to make it more beautiful, more ethereal. 

Today, my favourite told me that the way I wake up in the morning is not a mess, it’s a stretch of the mind as much as of the body. The way I carve my body is not to loosen muscle from the terrible way I sleep, but the arch of my arms is his morning drug.

He said that the way I like my coffee isn’t random, it’s a reflection of me- dark with a dash of whipped cream. My breakfast, a croissant, is our relationship- beautiful, classy, unique, and sometimes cheesy. 

He said that the house my parents built is beautiful, because it’s a reflection of them- brown wooden doors that are sturdy, brick walls that are hard to break down, a porch that’s easy to access for outsiders. 

He said we’ll build a glass house by the beach, so we see the beautiful waves and the sunrise, so that we are open to aesthetic beauty of the nature, but we’re not one with the nature. Boundary to save ourselves when the weather is too harsh. 

He says we can have a Summer home somewhere cool, where I can leave my hair open and he can kiss my neck by parting my hair. That the sweetness of my lips would be far better than the ripe golden mangoes that we’d have grown in our backyard. 

There’s something about being in love with artists and poets. Everything is music to them. Everything is beauty, everything is grace. Everything is ethereal and eternal.


2015 in Books.

37 books in a year. Probably a personal best. Thanks, Brunch

  1. Elanor and Park, Rainbow Rowell
  2. It’s a YA novel about two misfits, who like any YA protagonists, find love. It’s a brilliant book that deals with many issues. I’d rate it 8/10.
    What worked- The plot, the characters, the way conflict has been handled.
    What didn’t work- The narrative (I’m not a fan of changing POVs)
    Crying: 😭

  3. The Psychology of Terrorism, John Horgan
  4. I read it around the time of the attacks in Peshawar and the Je Suis Charlie movement, and the happenings made a lot more sense to me. I’d rate it 8/10.
    What worked- The compelling theories, the scope.
    What didn’t work- The structure of the book
    Crying: 😐

  5. The Long Silence, Shashi Deshpande
  6. It’s a beautiful book about what it means to be a woman in a man’s city- about resilience and humanity. I’d rate it 7/10
    What worked- The raw honesty, and the characters.
    What didn’t work- The negativity.
    Crying: 😐

  7. The Sociology and Psychology of Terrorism, Rex Hudson
  8. Again, this was read around the aforementioned attacks. I’d rate it 8.5/10
    What worked- The case studies, the non-discriminantly explained theories.
    What didn’t work- The narrative, the technique.
    Crying: 😐

  9. A Study in Scarlett, Arthur Conan Doyle
  10. The first story introducing Sherlock Holmes. Rating: 9/10
    What worked: The suspense, the mystery, and the unveiling of the crime.
    What didn’t work- The narrative, the fact that I’ve already read it- the original as well as versions of it.
    Crying: 😐

  11. The Lucifer Effect, Philip Zimbardo
  12. This book details The Stanford Prison Experiment and uses the findings to explain what was seen at the Abu Gharib Prison, where the author was an expert witness. Rating: 9/10
    What worked: The details, the writing style, the techniques.
    What didn’t work: the negativity.
    Crying: 🙁 (It was awesome and overwhelming)

  13. Interpreter of Maladies, Jhumpa Lahiri
  14. A set of short stories surrounding diasporic themes. Rating: 8/10.
    What worked: The narratives, how I could identify with most of the conflicts, the variety.
    What didn’t work: The pace of some of the stories.
    Crying: 😐

  15. The Parrot who Wouldn’t talk and other stories, Ruskin Bond
  16. Another set of short stories, which I found lying about my store cupboard.
    Rating: 6/10
    What worked: The writing style
    What didn’t work: It was a children’s book, so although I shouldn’t say it, it was too childish.
    Crying: 😐

  17. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J.K. Rowling
  18. Well. 😛
    Crying: 😥

  19. The Palace of Illusions, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni.
  20. It’s a retelling of The Mahabharata (an Indian mythological epic ) through the eyes of Panchali. Rating: 9/10
    What worked: The POV, the writing style, the characters.
    What didn’t work- At some parts, it got too preachy.
    Crying: 😟

  21. The Duff, Kody Keplinger
  22. Another YA tale about two seemingly misfit teens. This book is so much better than the movie, though!
    Rating: 7/10
    What worked- I could identify, the plot
    What didn’t work- The conflicts, the characters.
    Crying: 😖

  23. Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen
  24. A 17 year old ‘heroine in training’ who loves Gothic novels and loves the idea of drama.
    Rating: 7/10
    What worked: Typically Austen.
    What didn’t work: Typically Austen.
    Crying: 😐

  25. Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell
  26. Scarlett O’Hara and her struggle to survive and the will to live is what stood out for me.
    Rating: 8/10
    What I loved: The storyline, the way I could feel what the author wanted me to feel
    What I didn’t like: Scarlett is so annoying. Rhett is so frustrating. “I will think about it tomorrow. Tomorrow is another day”
    Crying: 😐

  27. A Farewell to Arms, Ernest Hemingway
  28. So much more than a World War I love story.
    Rating: 7/10
    What worked: It had the effect it was intended to have.
    What didn’t work: I’m not a fan of the cold way Hemingway writes.
    Crying: 😐

  29. All the Bright Places, Jennifer Niven
  30. It’s a story about a popular girl questioning her life and a not-so-popular boy struggling for it.
    Rating: 9/10
    What worked: I loved the character development, and how the protagonists interacted with each other
    What didn’t work: Sometimes, it felt like the characters were caricatures of themselves/what they’re supposed to represent.
    Crying: 😭

  31. Hyperbole and a Half, Allie Brosh
  32. It’s a brilliant! I read it mainly because it is one of my favourite blogs on the Internet.
    Rating: 10/10
    What worked: Everything!
    What didn’t work: It got over.
    Crying: 😕

  33. Is Everyone Hanging out without me?, Mindy Kaling
  34. It’s a hilarious collection of essays by the amazing Mindy Kaling.
    Rating: 9/10
    What worked: Her sense of humor, the stories she shared
    What didn’t work: Had to follow Hyperbole and a half.
    Crying:😐

  35. The Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet, Bernie Su.
  36. Adapted by the creators of The Lizzie Bennett Diaries, this is a modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice set in San Francisco.
    Rating: 8/10
    What worked: The form, the plot, the adaptation, the minor changes new to the book.
    What didn’t work: The chemistry wasn’t as sparkling as the web series.
    Crying:😐

  37. Mr Darcy’s Diary, Amanda Grange.
  38. A fanfiction-esque diary of Darcy.
    Rating: 9/10
    What worked: Enough Darcy to last for a while.
    What didn’t work: It felt like an adaptation- a bit too forced.
    Crying:😐

  39. A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin
  40. In my defence, I’m updated on the TV series (because it’s less time consuming, okay?)
    Rating: 7/10
    What worked: The writing style stood out for me
    What didn’t work: Because I already knew what was going to happen, it was frustrating to see the characters make those mistakes that lead up to their death.
    Crying:😐

  41. Royal Wedding (Princess Diaries #11), Meg Cabot
  42. The 11th book in the Princess Diaries series follows Mia aged 28.
    Rating: 8/10
    What worked: Pop culture references, and the usual thing that works for Princess Diaries. “Leia and Luke.”
    What didn’t work: Not enough Michael Moscovitz. It wasn’t as good as the previous books, maybe because Mia has more adult issues
    Crying: 😐

  43. I am Malala, Malala Yousufzai
  44. This book changed my perspective on what’s important in life, and how blinded I was to the world outside.
    Rating: 10/10
    What worked: Everything
    What didn’t work: It was a pretty difficult read, emotionally. But so worth it
    Crying:😟

  45. A Clash of Kings, George R R Martin
  46. Book #2, A Song of Ice and Fire.
    Rating: 7/10
    What worked and didn’t work: The same as that for GoT.
    Crying:😐

  47. Girl Online, Zoe Sugg
  48. An anonymous blogger (goes by the name Girl Online) who meets a mystery boy when her family takes a workation to NYC.
    Rating: 7/10
    What works: Full of Pop Culture references, “Wiki”, Penny’s brother is a cutie, Brooklyn Boy.
    What doesn’t: The plot is kind of predictable.
    Crying:😟

  49. A Night to Remember, Walter Lord (Audio)
  50. I heard this is the audio book format
    Rating: 8/10.
    What worked: The speed, the technique, the picturesque writing
    What didn’t work: I’m not the biggest fan of audio books, as I learnt.
    Crying: 😐

  51. Seriously… I’m Kidding, Ellen Degeneres
  52. It’s by Ellen, okay?
    Rating: 10/10
    What worked: It’s beyond hilarious!
    What didn’t work: My parents woke up because I was laughing too hard.
    Crying: 😂😂😂

  53. Howl and Other Poems, Allen Ginsberg
  54. I’d been wanting to read it for a couple of years now. And I don’t think there was a better time to read it than at night, when everyone around me was asleep
    Rating: 8/10
    What worked: The rawness of Ginsberg’s voice, the hard hitting roughness
    What didn’t work: Didn’t understand some of the references.
    Crying: 😐

  55. Princess in Love, Meg Cabot
  56. The third installment of Princess Diaries, read because I needed more Michael Moscovitz.
    Rating: 8/10
    What worked: What usually works for Princess Diaries. Also, Michael!
    What didn’t work: He loves you, Mia! Good lord, young lady.
    Crying:😐

  57. Bridget Jones’ Diary, Helen Fielding
  58. Another reinterpretation of Pride and Prejudice.
    Rating: 6/10
    What worked; The familiarity of the story, the format
    What didn’t work: The style of writing.
    Crying:😐

  59. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
  60. Again, well. 😛
    Rating: 9/10
    What worked: The POV, the plotline, the character growth.
    What didn’t work: A little less hedonistic pleasure while reading
    Crying:😕

  61. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, J.K.Rowling
  62. WHY DID RON AND HARRY COMPLAIN ABOUT HOMEWORK???
    Rating: 10/10
    What I liked: The hilarious notes
    What I didn’t: The wait for the movie!
    Crying:😟 (cuz I’m not a witch)

  63. Ravan and Eddie, Kiran Nagarkar
  64. This is about two young boys living in a chawl in Bombay, whose fates are intertwined in ways we cannot even imagine.
    Rating: 7/10
    What I liked: The novelty. The raw truth. The writing style.
    What I didn’t like: The plot kept stretching for a bit.
    Crying: 😐

  65. The Color of Our Sky, Amita Trasi
  66. Two girls who are as different as you can be, are each other’s strength and reason to live years after tragedy hits them.
    Rating: 9/10
    What I like: The narration, the plot line, the character development
    What I didn’t like: Some of the characters annoyed me at some point. But they were supposed to. Like you’re supposed to hate Umbrige.
    Crying: 😢

  67. On the Road, Jack Kerouac
  68. Been meaning to read this for years! It’s about being on the road, d’uh. But it’s SO MUCH MORE.
    Rating: 8/10
    What I liked: Kerouac spoke to my caged bird soul
    What I didn’t like: I want breaks in books, okay? Also, I thought it would be my new favourite book. But it wasn’t.
    Crying:😐

  69. Girl On Tour, Zoe Sugg
  70. It’s a sequel. Had to read, obs.
    Rating: 6/10
    What I liked: YA! *spoiler* Wiki being happy, finally. *end of spoiler*
    What I didn’t like: Less Brooklyn Boy. Too predictable.
    Crying:😐

  71. A Work in Progress, Connor Franta
  72. It’s fantastic, it’s a memoir, and I got all the feels. Connor, I really wish I were a guy, and then Troye, you, and I could be gay together.
    Rating: 10/10
    What I liked: He was so honest, and open, and just awesome! The book was aesthetically pleasing, and looked like his Instagram account. Is there anything this boy can’t do?
    What I didn’t like: It got over. Also, within 2 weeks of me finishing the book, he announced the hardcover version. I’m broke, OK?
    Crying:😢 (Because I’m SO PROUD)

  73. Love and Misadventures, Lang Laev
  74. Lang Laev is BRILLIANT. I have to thank my friends for this one. They gifted this for my birthday!
    Rating: 10/10
    What I liked: Everything. Every poem. Aaaa.
    What I didn’t like: Nothing. Seriously. She deserves much more recognition than she already does.
    Crying:😥 (Because so beautiful)

  75. Oedipus the King, Sophocles.
  76. Oedipus. As a Psych and a Literature student, I HAD to read it.
    Rating: 6/10
    What I liked: Well, the plot was quite nice. And a little creepy, but nice.
    What I didn’t like: Not my cup of tea.
    Crying: 😐

Obviously, my PERSONAL ideas. Nothing more. Not even reviews. Just what I thought about the books.
Crying scale (from least to most): 😐🙁😟😖😢😥😭
I’ve obviously been writing this since end of December.😂
Also, now I have a poetry blog on Tumblr. You may want to check it out? Here. Please do. 🙂

Twitter: @WallflowerBlack